Welcome to Poetic Pause

Whether it be for a brief moment or longer, we all need to stay still for a moment and just be. I've found over the years that my poetry helps me find those moments. I can drift away when reading the poetry of others and discover new ideas, new ways of thinking, of being.

When I settle down to write a new poem, or to work on one written previously, I drift away again, and grow as I write. Time takes on a different dimension, and my head goes places it has never been before. I love to write poetry, it's one of the best things there in the world - it's up there with chocolate when it's going well!

There are so many things to write poetry about, and so many different forms of poetry, from tiny 17 syllable haiku, to 200 page verse novels. All of the different forms have merits, and all can take you and your readers to interesting places.



Contact me

jeebers@aussiebb.com.au
REDBANKS SA 5502

"Climate" Poetry Competition

ADELAIDE PLAINS POETS Inc

POETRY COMPETITION 2014/15

‘CLIMATE’

1st, 2nd & 3rd cash prizes, plus Highly Commended & Commended certificates as awarded by judge. Total prize pool over $700

ENTRY GUIDELINES

  • Work entered in this competition must be original, in English, unpublished and not have won a prize in any other competition. Authors retain copyright.
  • Theme ‘Climate’
  • Poems entered must in some way refer to the theme
  • Open Class - poets 18 years & older
  • Junior classes –
    • Primary School student (one poem only)
    • Secondary School student (one poem only)
  • To maintain anonymity, entrant’s name should appear on entry form only, not on poems. Entry forms are to include entrant’s name, address, phone number, titles of poems submitted.
  • Entries should be typed where possible, on one side of paper only, one poem to a page
  • Poems to be no longer than 60 lines
  • Entry fees: Open class $5.00 per poem entered

Junior classes - no entry fee, only one poem per student

  • Cheques/money orders to be made payable to Adelaide Plains Poets Inc
  • Entries to: Competition Secretary, 1594 Germantown Rd REDBANKS SA 5502
  • Entries to be received by close of business 24 January 2015 – entries received after this date will not be considered for the competition.
  • Authors should retain a copy of their work, entries will not be returned without provision of a SSAE

For further details contact:

Ms C Cordon (08) 85272412; 0418 806 490; jeebers@aussiebb.com.au http://carolyn-poeticpause.blogspot.com.au/

____________________________________

ADELAIDE PLAINS POETS INC

POETRY COMPETITION 2014/15

‘CLIMATE’

ENTRY FORM

Name…………………..……………………Phone…………………

Address……………………………………………..…………………

.…………………………………………………………………………

Email………………………………..

Title of poem/s - ……………………………………………………..

……………………………………………………..

……………………………………………………..

(use back of page for additional entries)

Entrants’ names or other details must not appear on poems

Declaration by author: I agree to comply with the Entry Guidelines and declare that the written work submitted in my name is my own original work and has not been copied in part, or in full, from any other source.

Author’s signature…………………………………..date…………………...

Date of birth (if entering junior section) ………………………… Secondary School/Primary School

Name of school (if entering junior section) …………………………… (circle as appropriate)

$5.00 per poem (OPEN CLASS ONLY – NO FEE FOR JUNIOR ENTRIES)

CLOSING DATE FOR ENTRIES 24 January 2015

Cheques/money orders to be made payable to Adelaide Plains Poets Inc, and sent with entries to Competition Secretary, 1594 Germantown Rd REDBANKS SA 5502

Authors should retain a copy of their work, entries will not be returned without provision of a stamped self-addressed envelope, and a written request.






Pay your Poetry Competition fee here

Hello,

Poets have been asking for electronic ways to pay their competition fee. These are the details you need:

Name: Adelaide Plains Poets
Bank: Bank SA
BSB No: 105-009
Account: 105954340

  • Identify yourself: Make sure you provide some details (eg name) in the Reference Name/Number section of your payment transfer so we can identify the payment as being from you.

In the past, some poets have included bank notes with their poetry entries. We certainly don't say this is the best way to pay - not often, but sometimes, mail can be interfered with, and money lost. Electronic transfer is a great and safe way to go.



Saturday, January 25, 2014

Poetry in Pubs?

Have you ever thought about where poetry could happen? Libraries certainly have poetry occurring, in terms of books on shelves, workshops and book signings. Where else could there be poetry happening? Bookshops, certainly you can find poetry happening there too.

Schools have poetry being taught to students, both reading the poems of established poets, and the writing of new poetry by the students. Poetry happens in homes, reading and writing too. Where else could you find poetry happening, do you think?

One place, probably my favourite place where poetry happens, is in pubs! There are poetry readings going on in pubs in Australia and in Ireland, and probably other countries too. I know about the Poetry @ the Pub because I'm involved in a monthly event in one pub, and have been for many years.

The Poets@thePub I know about is the event that happens in the South Australian town of Gawler on the last Sunday of every month except December. The action starts at 2pm and goes on until 4 pm. This event has been going on for almost twenty years. It was started by Martin Johnson, a keen poet who has become an icon in the town of Gawler.

Martin has given poetry back to the people, holding poetry readings in a variety of pubs, forced to move on as pubs changed hands or closed down. The last pub Martin had the poetry readings at was the Prince Albert hotel, on Murray Street. Then Martin felt he'd had enough of the poetry game and wanted to give more back to his music.

Fortunately a committee of dedicated attendees of the Gawler Poets @ the Pub got together and took over from Martin. They did a good job, and the numbers of poets coming to the PA once a month kept up. Two of the committee members have had to move on, but the remaining two are still extremely keen to keen the poetry happening at the PA Hotel.

There is an anthology produced every year, with the best of the poems read from each poet chosen published. This anthology is a fine record of contemporary poetry. The quality varies a little bit perhaps, but the standard is still very good. The annual anthology is a great book to add to anyone's poetry bookcase!

The Gawler Poets@thePub often has a guest poet, where the guest is given fifteen minutes to read their works and talk about their poetry. There have been poets from other countries and from interstate too. It certainly looks like Gawler Poets@thePub will keep on going for many years to come!

2 comments:

Veronica Hester said...

Hey, when are you going to announce the winners for the poetry competition?

John Malone said...

May the poetry club long prosper :)

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Judges comments 2012 'Crossroads' competition

Cross roads: Judge’s Speech

Among the almost seventy poems submitted by adults, nine stood out. Two --- ‘Sticks and Bones’(by Heather Lunney NSW) and ‘Atticus Forby’ (by Terrence Mohr SA)--- dealt with individuals struggling with identity. Both rhymed and were fine poems. I certainly commend them, as I do ‘Blackberry Pies’(by Beverly Lello VIC) and ‘The Wrong Woman’(by Gaylene Carbis VIC) which dealt with cars. The most curious poem, also commended, was ‘Wystan Hughes walks past the Musee de Beaux Arts and drops into a nearby blues club’ [after W H Auden] (by Mike Hopkins SA), an accomplished, witty and entertaining piece which Auden would have appreciated.

Now we get down to the Highly Commended poems of which there are two. ‘Pandora’s Box’ (by Shelley Hansen QLD) is a thought provoking piece applied skillfully to the set topic with an uplifting ending. It is, if anything, an Ode to Hope. ‘Crossroads’ (by Janet Upcher TAS) is a tender, sensitive poem with some original imagery. It depicts that moment that all parents and grandparents know when the child becomes an adult stepping out into the adult world. It is a time of celebration and loss. Conventionally rhymed, it is beautifully and achingly realized.

In sharp contrast we have one of the two equal prizewinners ‘do you take this man?’ (by David Campbell VIC) which reminds me of the poetry of Anna Walwicz .It has a strong narrative drive mingled with stream of consciousness. It is hot and scarifying. This poem hit me from the very start. I knew it would be a finalist. It makes powerful reading.

The other equal first prize winner is ‘The Water Tower, Tailem Bend’ (by Meryl McDougall SA). I have a soft spot for water towers though the writer would not have known this. It is a very accomplished poem which melds current concern for the river with the legend of Ngurunderi with which I am not familiar though the story is sketched in the poem. It is an environmental piece with some clever imagery. The poet maintains full control over its fifteen rhyming stanzas. It never falters.

Now to secondary schools. Of the nine submissions, one stood out and it’s worthy of First Prize. ‘An Offer Not to be Refused’(by Talia Walker NSW) deals with that crossroad moment when one is offered his or her first cigarette. It is the sinewy, conniving, persuasive voice of temptation with which we are all familiar . There are some clever, original images in this macabre, sarcastic piece. I loved it!

There were only two primary entries neither special in any way.

I enjoyed reading and judging these entries and want to thank the organisers for giving me the opportunity. To all those who submitted, the best of wishes in your future writing endeavours.

John Malone